Tip sheet

Wayne State University experts available to comment on trending topics for October

Wayne State University's PR team compiles a list of university experts who can speak about trending topics and significant milestones each month.

To reach an expert, contact:

Ted Montgomery, 313-577-5699, tedmontgomery@wayne.edu

Tom Reynolds, 313-577-8093, treynolds@wayne.edu

AMERICAN PHARMACISTS MONTH – OCTOBER

American Pharmacists Month is a time to recognize pharmacists' commitment to health care and all that they contribute to the community.

Joseph Fava, Pharm.D., assistant professor (clinical), is an expert in community pharmacy practice advancement and ambulatory care.

Brittany Stewart, assistant professor (clinical), is an expert in transition of care, disease state management, immunizations and medication therapy management.

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH – OCTOBER

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 252,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2019, and the disease is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women across the nation, accounting for 15% of all new cases. Breast cancer is second to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death in American women.

Michele Cote, Ph.D, associate professor, Department of Oncology, has conducted extensive research on breast cancer risk among African American women and has worked closely with the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System. Cote is also a co-investigator on a study of ovarian cancer in African American women, an active member of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium and a Midwest regional center investigator with the Women's Health Initiative. 

NATIONAL BULLYING PREVENTION MONTH – OCTOBER

Research indicates that 70.6% of young people and 70.4% of staff have witnessed bullying in school. Wayne State College of Education faculty can discuss ways to help students, staff and parents recognize, address and prevent bullying and create a safe, supportive school climate.

Elizabeth Barton, associate professor in research, is available to speak about bullying, youth violence, conflict resolution and victimization.

Cheryl Somers, professor and assistant dean of the Division of Theoretical and Behavioral Foundations, is prepared to address bullying and how it affects the mental health of young people.

ADHD AWARENESS MONTH – OCTOBER

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 9.4% (6.1 million) of children 2-17 years old had been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to parent surveys in 2016. One of the most common childhood behavior disorders, ADHD can impact students' behavior and progress at school.

Susan Gabel, professor of inclusive education, can discuss signs and symptoms of ADHD, suggest interventions, and share strategies parents and teachers can use to provide support and structure for learners with ADHD.

NATIONAL DEPRESSION EDUCATION AND AWARENESS MONTH – OCTOBER

Scott Branson, assistant professor of counselor education, is prepared to discuss warning signs and behaviors and what individuals can do if they suspect an older adult in their life is suffering from depression.

DYSLEXIA AWARENESS MONTH – OCTOBER

According to the International Dyslexia Association, "one-half of all the students who qualify for special education are classified as having a learning disability (6-7%). About 85% of those students have a primary learning disability in reading and language processing."

Susan Gabel, professor of inclusive education, is ready to speak about the signs of dyslexia and what individuals — particularly parents and educators — can do to support children with dyslexia. 

NATIONAL CYBER SECURITY AWARENESS MONTH – OCTOBER

Initiated by the National Cyber Security Division within the Department of Homeland Security and the nonprofit National Cyber Security Alliance, the month raises awareness about the importance of cybersecurity.

Garrett McManaway, senior director of information security and compliance at Wayne State's Computer and Information Technology (C&IT), can discuss ransomware, examining what it is and how damaging it is to municipalities, local governments, school districts and other institutions. He can also offer tips on protections that should be taken to avert the possibilities of hacking and ways to minimize vulnerabilities.

INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ELDERLY – OCT. 1

International Day for the Elderly is dedicated to honor, respect and care for the world's elderly.

According to the United Nations, "one of every 10 persons is now 60 years or older. By the year 2050, one of five will be 60 years or older; by 2150, it will be one of three persons".

Peter Lichtenberg is the director of both the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute and the Institute of Gerontology, and he is the founding director of the Wayne State University Lifespan Alliance. He also is a national expert in financial capacity assessment and financial exploitation of older adults. 

NATIONAL DIVERSITY DAY – OCT. 4

National Diversity Day was established in 2005 to celebrate and embrace who we are, despite our differences — no matter what race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, nationality or disability. It is a day to reflect on and learn about different cultures and ideologies, and an opportunity to vow acceptance and tolerance. On this day, we can consciously address these areas at educational and religious institutions, as well as in the workplace and at home.

Marquita Chamblee is the associate provost for diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer at Wayne State University. In this role, she leads efforts that advance diversity and inclusion across campus and into the broader community.

WORLD TEACHERS' DAY – OCT. 5

Teachers deserve recognition, thanks and appreciation. Aside from parents and direct family, who else has as much influence on the hearts and minds of children? Teachers not only educate, but they help to shape children's beliefs, values and behaviors.

Kathleen Crawford-McKinney, College of Education associate professor, is available to discuss the impact teachers. Her expertise is literacy engagement in children's literature, writing, curriculum, collaborative learning environments and inquiry. Crawford-McKinney's current focus is WSU's Dream Keepers urban teacher residency program, which is committed to preparing urban teachers to meet the needs of PK-12 learners through culturally sustaining pedagogy.

WORLD MENTAL HEALTH DAY – OCT. 10

World Mental Health Day raises awareness of mental health issues around the world and mobilizes efforts in support of mental health. The day provides an opportunity for all stakeholders working on mental health issues to talk about their work, and what needs to be done to make mental health care a reality across the globe.

David Rosenberg, M.D., chair of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences, is ready to talk about mental health issues and the significance of mobilizing efforts in support of mental health. A widely published researcher, Dr. Rosenberg is sought by the national media as an expert on child psychiatry. He wrote the first textbook on pediatric psychopharmacology, Textbook of Pharmacotherapy for Childhood and Adolescent Psychiatric Disorders, which is now in its third edition.

UNIVERSAL MUSIC DAY – OCT. 12

What is it about music that appeals to almost everyone on some level? The goal of Universal Music Day is to enrich communities with the knowledge and power of music, musicians and music-making.

Joshua Duchan, associate professor of music history and director of graduate studies, is prepared to discuss the importance of music and its universal appeal. An ethnomusicologist specializing in American popular music, Duchan has authored two books, Powerful Voices: The Musical and Social World of Collegiate A Cappella (2012) and Billy Joel: America's Piano Man (2017). 

A CONVERSATION WITH PRESIDENT M. ROY WILSON – OCT. 16

Irvin D. Reid Honors College Dean John Corvino will interview Wayne State President M. Roy Wilson about the state of the university, 10 a.m. at the David Adamany Undergraduate Library, Bernath Auditorium.

NATIONAL HEALTH EDUCATION WEEK – OCT. 21-25

Nate McCaughtry, professor; assistant dean of the Division of Kinesiology, Health and Sport Studies; and director of the Center for Health and Community Impact, is available to highlight the center's role in improving health outcomes for youth, seniors and families in Michigan through a variety of programs aimed at providing nutrition education, promoting physical activity and increasing access to healthy food.

Noel Kulik, assistant professor in health education (community health), can discuss child and adolescent health, obesity prevention and treatment, nutrition and physical activity behavioral interventions, and social support.

OPEN ACCESS WEEK - OCTOBER 21-27

Open access (OA) refers to free, unrestricted online access to research outputs such as journal articles and books. OA content is open to all, with no access fees. This is a huge movement in academia now because Open Access is attempting to return scholarly publishing to its original purpose: to spread knowledge and allow that knowledge to be built upon. Price barriers should not prevent students (or anyone) from getting access to research they need and faculty should not have to pay to access their own research. Wayne State's libraries are running a full month of events around Open Scholarship.

Cheryl Ball, director of digital publishing, and Joshua Neds-Fox, coordinator for digital publishing, are ready to discuss Open Access.

UNITED NATIONS DAY – OCT. 24

United Nations Day marks the anniversary of the entry into the U.N. Charter in 1945. Oct. 24 has been celebrated as United Nations Day since 1948. In 1971, the United Nations General Assembly recommended that the day be observed by member states as a public holiday.

Paul Kershaw, visiting assistant professor, is a historian of 20th century U.S. and Mexican history, specializing in the United States, the world, the politics of economic development and capitalism. His current book project investigates the intellectual and political development of International Monetary Fund structural adjustment programs and demonstrates how those programs became the first-line response to a series of international debt crises.