Tip sheet

Wayne State University experts available to comment on trending topics for July

Wayne State University's PR team compiles a list of university experts who can speak about trending topics and significant milestones each month.

To reach an expert, contact: Katie McMillan, 586-344-8788, katie.mcmillan@wayne.edu

ONGOING NEWS-RELATED TOPICS AND EXPERTS

RETURN TO WORK AND SCHOOL

With employees alternating between working from their offices and from home, there can be some significant challenges, both personally and professionally. Matthew Piszczek, assistant professor of management, is an expert in work-life issues, remote work, workforce aging, commuting, strategic HRM, employee/labor relations, and offers a wide range of solutions.

The practice of psychology in the workforce is often in the news today, as well as issues surrounding leadership, well-being, and diversity and inclusion. Lars Johnson, an assistant professor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, can talk about these and related industrial organization issues.

RUSSIA-UKRAINE CONFLICT

Ukraine, which had been a republic of the USSR, won national independence as the Soviet Union broke up in 1991. It moved to shed its Russian imperial legacy and forge increasingly close ties with the West. Now tensions have boiled over at the Russia-Ukrainian border as Ukraine threatens to join NATO, a move Russia opposes.

  • Aaron Retish, a professor specializing in Soviet history, can talk about how this conflict could affect Michigan residents with ties to Ukraine and Russia.
  • Alisa Moldavanova is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and is originally from Odesa, Ukraine. She can talk about the struggle of families currently in Ukraine, especially with those who have relatives in the U.S.
  • Vincent Artman can talk about political and cultural geography, political theology, and the former Soviet Union.
  • Dan Geller, professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Wayne State University can talk about international politics, defense policy and foreign policy.
  • Fred Pearson, professor of political science and former director of the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, can talk about international politics and conflict, international economic analysis, political and civil conflict analysis and peacemaking, peacekeeping and peacebuilding.

MASS SHOOTINGS

Pontus Leander, the new director of Wayne State's Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, can talk about public reactions to and the social psychology of mass shootings, as well as the psychology of hate crime denial.

VARIOUS ASPECTS OF ROE V. WADE

With the Supreme Court recently repealing Roe v. Wade, there are several legal, ethical and medical issues that require clarity. Wayne State offers several experts who can provide incisive analysis.

Law/Ethics/Precedent/State/Federal Issues

  • Lance Gable, professor of law, can talk about bioethics and the law and public health law.
  • Chris Lund, professor of law, can talk about matters related to constitutional laws and religious liberty.

Medicine/Public Health

  • Megan Hicks, assistant professor in the School of Social Work, can talk about risk and protective factors influencing health disparities among Black youth
  • Ijeoma Nnodim Opara is a double-board certified assistant professor of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at the Wayne State University School of Medicine. She can talk about health equity and justice in medicine.

SUPPLY CHAIN ISSUES

One of the least understood issues arising from the pandemic is the severe disruption in supply chains. Kevin Ketels, an assistant professor in global supply chain management, can offer perspective and insight about this complicated issue.

INFLATION AND RISING INTEREST RATES

The continuing twin economic threats to the American economy — galloping inflation and soaring interest rates — are damaging global confidence in the economy of the United States and creating financial hardships for consumers. Kevin Cotter, chair of the Department of Economics, can explain what can be done in both the short and long term to quell this economic uncertainty.

DETROIT AREA FLOODING AND INFRASTRUCTURE CONCERNS

It's been a year since flooding in the Detroit metropolitan area caused devastating damage to property and the roadways. Ongoing concerns about the aging infrastructure have ramped up and residents are wondering how to cope with future flooding.

Carol Miller, professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Bill Shuster, department of civil and environmental engineering chair, are available to talk about the current infrastructure problems and what solutions may be available.

SPORTS AND THE SPREAD OF THE VIRUS

  • Dr. Tamara Hew-Butler, a podiatric physician specializing in sports medicine and an associate professor of exercise and sport science, is ready to talk about the impact of sports on the spread of viruses.

CANADA DAY/DOMINION DAY – JULY 1
Canada Day, originally known as Dominion Day until 1982, celebrates Canadian nationalism and heritage. On July 1, 1867, Canada officially became self-governing with the passage of the British North America Act in the British Parliament.

  • Karen Marrero, associate professor of history, has studied Canada in the late 18th and early 19th centuries and is prepared to talk about the significance of Canada Day – politically, culturally and historically.

STAY OUT OF THE SUN DAY – JULY 3
Summer is now stretching over the nation, prompting a mass exodus to the beaches and waterways, especially in Michigan and its Great Lakes. "Stay Out of the Sun Day" encourages us to be aware of the damage that the sun's rays can cause to our skin.

  • Steven Daveluy, M.D., assistant professor and program director in the Department of Dermatology, can talk about the importance of taking precautions to protect our skin from the sun during the summer.

INDEPENDENCE DAY – JULY 4
The fourth of July is a national holiday celebrating the birth of the United States of America and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. The document declared freedom for the colonies from British rule.

  • Professors Sandra VanBurkleo, Marc Kruman and Kidada Williams are prepared to offer background into the specific origins of the Independence Day holiday and the major players who made it happen.

BASTILLE DAY – JULY 14
Bastille Day, or French National Day, is celebrated every year in France to recognize the beginning of the French Revolution. The storming of the Bastille prison and fortress facility in Paris on July 14, 1789, was an early event of the decade-long revolution. Bastille Day represents the end of the monarchy and led to the formation of the French Republic in 1792.

  • Janine Lanza, French historian and associate professor of history, is prepared to talk about Bastille Day.

MOON DAY – JULY 20
The Apollo program was created to put the first human on the moon. Apollo 11 fulfilled that dream when it launched on July 16, 1969. On July 20, 1969, the Lunar Module touched down on its surface and American astronaut Neil Armstrong took his legendary first steps on the moon. Moon Day commemorates that historic event.

  • Ed Cackett, astronomy and physics professor, is ready to discuss space travel and the Apollo missions to the moon.

THE BAROUDEUR – JULY 23
After a two-year hiatus, the Baroudeur, Wayne State University's cycling event to support student scholarships and the university's Helping Individuals Go Higher (HIGH) Program, returns. The 2022 Baroudeur is presented by AAA – The Auto Club Group. Nearly 800 cyclists, including Wayne State president M. Roy Wilson, will participate in their choice of four urban courses – 20, 37, 62 or 100 miles. Participants and volunteers will enjoy a post-ride festival on campus complete with lunch, a custom craft beer from Batch Brewing, music and more. 

  • Matt Lockwood, ride director, is ready to discuss the event

DETROIT'S 320TH BIRTHDAY – JULY 24
Detroit, Michigan's largest city, has undergone significant changes since its founding in 1701. There have been major population and economic shifts over the last three centuries as various industries have flourished and floundered. Notably, the automotive industry contributed to the city being deemed the automobile capital of the world and resulted in Detroit's moniker, the "Motor City."

  • Karen Marrero, associate professor of history, can discuss early North American and Native American history exploring the lucrative fur trade in the 18th century, to the lumber barons of the 19th century.
  • Tracy Neumann, associate professor of history, specializes in transnational and global approaches to 20th century North American history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. She teaches courses on 20th century U.S. history and urban history.