September 19, 2019

C-SPAN rolls onto campus Sept. 26

C-SPAN, the public affairs network, will bring its 45-foot customized mobile classroom and production studio to Wayne State University on Thursday, Sept. 26, to broadcast from campus and engage students, teachers, community members and elected officials. The stop is part of a seven-week tour of 10 states, including several battleground states that may play a pivotal role in the 2020 presidential election.

The C-SPAN bus will be parked by the flagpoles on Gullen Mall between the David Adamany Undergraduate Library and the Student Center Building.
 
During the Wayne State visit, Richard Burr, Detroit News assistant city editor for politics and government editor, will be interviewed live from 8 to 8:30 a.m. during C-SPAN's call-in program, "Washington Journal." He will discuss Michigan's role as a battleground state in the upcoming election.

"These states will be among the key battlegrounds in the 2020 presidential race," said Steve Scully, political editor for C-SPAN. "By visiting these communities, C-SPAN will provide another component to our extensive Campaign 2020 coverage and give our viewers an in-depth, unfiltered look at politics, from the early days on the campaign trail right up to Inauguration Day."
 
Bus visitors will also be invited to share their thoughts on issues they want presidential candidates to address during the campaign between 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. as part of the "Voices from the Road" project.
 
Through interactive kiosks and demonstrations aboard the bus, visitors will learn about C-SPAN's in-depth coverage of the American political process, Campaign 2020 programming and comprehensive online educational resources, including C-SPAN.org. The website includes an extensive video library containing over 252,000 hours of searchable content for viewing, research and education purposes.
 
C-SPAN, which provides Americans with unfiltered access to congressional proceedings, was created in 1979 as a public service by the cable television industry and is now funded through fees paid by cable and satellite companies that provide C-SPAN programming.